help-circle
rss




Cross-posted from https://lemmy.perthchat.org/post/158024

Amino acid
Advise a resource (link) where I can see the nutritional value, but specifically** I need to know the amount of each amino acids** in each of them, of course, vegetable products.


"While we found that 50% of people wanted penalties increased, there was nearly 80% support for increasing prosecution numbers," a researcher says.



  • coja
  • 1M
Just bought new cookbooks.
![](https://lemmy.ml/pictrs/image/a664798f-9866-43f3-bbc4-540e3fc03688.jpeg)

If you live in the EU, you may be interested in signing this petition.


cross-posted from: https://beehaw.org/post/143391 > ...arrival of Buddhism from Korea in the 6th century. At that time, the Japanese were meat eaters. Venison and wild boar (which was sometimes called yama kujira, or “mountain whale”) were popular. Aristocrats enjoyed hunting and feasting on deer entrails and wild fowl. > > Yet Buddhism teaches that humans can be reincarnated into other living beings, including animals. Meat eaters run the risk of consuming their own reincarnated ancestors: not a very palatable thought. Buddhist principles of respect for life and avoidance of waste, especially in the case of food, slowly began to shape Japanese culture and seep into native Shinto beliefs. > > In 675 A.D., Emperor Tenmu issued the first official decree banning consumption of beef, horse, dog, chicken, and monkey during the height of farming season from April to September. As time went on, the practice would be solidified and expanded into a year-round taboo against all meat eating. Also worth reading https://www.kikkoman.co.jp/kiifc/foodculture/pdf_09/e_002_008.pdf --- I have come to this after reading https://standardebooks.org/ebooks/etsu-inagaki-sugimoto/a-daughter-of-the-samurai/text/chapter-4 > I was about eight years old when I had my first taste of meat. For twelve centuries, following the introduction of the Buddhist religion, which forbids the killing of animals, the Japanese people were vegetarians. In late years, however, both belief and custom have changed considerably, and now, though meat is not universally eaten, it can be found in all restaurants and hotels. But when I was a child it was looked upon with horror and loathing.






cross-posted from: https://lemmy.ml/post/458886 > > Indeed, when independent researchers at Johns Hopkins University decided to get the best estimates they could by combing through the published literature, they found that in the 11 life cycle analyses they turned up, the average greenhouse gas footprint from plant-based meats was just 7 percent of beef for an equivalent amount of protein. The plant-based products were also more climate-friendly than pork or chicken — although less strikingly so, with greenhouse gas emissions just 57 percent and 37 percent, respectively, of those for the actual meats. > > > > Similarly, the Hopkins team found that producing plant-based meats used less water: 23 percent that of beef, 11 percent that of pork, and 24 percent that of chicken for the same amount of protein. There were big savings, too, for land, with the plant-based products using 2 percent that of beef, 18 percent that of pork, and 23 percent that of chicken for a given amount of protein. The saving of land is important because, if plant-based meats end up claiming a significant market share, the surplus land could be allowed to revert to forest or other natural vegetation; these store carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and contribute to biodiversity conservation. Other studies show that plant-based milks offer similar environmental benefits over cow’s milk. > > ... > > > Soy milk, for example, requires just 7 percent as much land and 4 percent as much water as real milk, while emitting only 31 percent as much greenhouse gas. Oat milk needs 8 percent of the land and 8 percent of the water, while releasing just 29 percent as much greenhouse gas. Even almond milk often regarded as a poor choice because almond orchards guzzle so much fresh water—uses just 59 percent as much water as real milk. > > > > But not all plant-based milks deliver the same nutrient punch. While soy milk provides almost the same amount of protein as cow’s milk, almond milk provides only about 20 percent as much—an important consideration for some. On a per-unit-protein basis, therefore, almond milk actually generates more greenhouse gas and uses more water than cow’s milk.

An online space for the vegan people of Lemmy.

Rules and miscellanous:

  1. We take for granted that if you enage in this community, you understand that veganism is about the animals. You either are vegan for the animals, or you are not (this is not to say that discussions about climate/environment/health are not allowed, of course)
  2. No omni/carnist apologists. This is not a place where to ask to be hand-holded into veganims. Omnis coddling/backpatting is not tolerated, nor are /r/DebateAVegan-like threads
  3. Use content warnings and NSFW tags for triggering content
  4. circlejerking belongs to /c/vegancirclejerk
  5. Lemmy’s CoC applies here too, of course
  6. in case you need to report something, use Lemmy’s native tool or message one of the mods on Matrix
  7. sorry for the passive-aggressive tone of these rules
  • 0 users online
  • 1 user / day
  • 1 user / week
  • 10 users / month
  • 23 users / 6 months
  • 1 subscriber
  • 30 Posts
  • 11 Comments
  • Modlog
Lemmy
A community of privacy and FOSS enthusiasts, run by Lemmy’s developers

What is Lemmy.ml

Rules

  1. No bigotry - including racism, sexism, ableism, homophobia, transphobia, or xenophobia. Code of Conduct.
  2. Be respectful. Everyone should feel welcome here.
  3. No porn.
  4. No Ads / Spamming.

Feel free to ask questions over in: